Guided Fishing in Hervey Bay

Fishing For Pelagics On The Fraser Coast

When it comes to fishing for pelagics, the Fraser Coast has the reputation of being a first class light tackle destination. And deservedly so!

There’s a myriad of sheltered inshore waters, brimming with the many pelagic species that migrate along the Queensland coast. And it’s all so accessible that even the small boat angler can get in on some serious pelagic action.

We’ve spent countless hours exploring the pelagic scene here, and we’ve got it pretty well wired. Much of our time has been spent exploring every nook and cranny with some of Australia’s fishing greats. And the fishing is so good that it’s featured in dozens of DVD’s and television productions.

So if the idea of fishing for pelagics from a small boat with fly or light spin tackle gets you going, you’re in the right place. In fact, we’d probably say you’re in the best place! There are no shortage of azure bays, quiet inlets and open coastal areas to explore. And all can provide spectacular fishing.

Fishing for pelagics is pretty exciting stuff. It’s about sight casting in crystal clear water as thousands of voracious predators churn the surface into a froth. Or dropping an offering in front of fast moving targets as they patrol flats. It’s about savage strikes, line burning runs, sore biceps and the kind of photos that make the boys at work green.

There’s nothing better!

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When To Go Fishing For Pelagics

In most places, fishing for pelagics is a seasonal affair – it’s the hot weather that brings the hot fishing. Yes, you’ll find a few fish throughout the year. School mackerel, for instance. But if you want the kind of giddying action that causes nose bleeds, summer is the time.

Most years the pelagic season is in full swing by October and continues to keep us on the gunnels until Late March. There are exceptions, of course.

Often the action doesn’t start until the sun is well up over the water. Baitfish are often more scattered and down deeper during low light. But once the sun hits the water they “ball up” near the surface, seeking safety in numbers. Anywhere there’s a concentration of baitfish is the perfect place to try fishing for pelagics.

Fishing for pelagics is often best on sunny days with just a slight ripple on the water. Under those conditions the fish are often near the surface, herding bait into tight balls. A ripple on the surface often allows boats to get a little closer, bringing the action within casting range. And since pelagics often swim into the oncoming wind it can make it easy to drift back onto skittish fish.

Generally the best time for fishing for pelagics is around the bigger tides, associated with the full or new moon. Pelagics like current – which gets the baitfish moving and makes it easier for them to ambush and feed. Like the old adage says: when there is no run there is no fun!

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Fishing Fraser Coast

Pelagic Species Of The Fraser And Capricorn Coasts

There is no shortage of pelagic species to target in this part of the world……

There are the razor gang, of course. Spanish mackerel are one of our premier species, but grey, spotted, school and broad bar macks can be prevalent sometimes too. These guys can slice up the water with astonishing speed, carving up baitfish as they go.

Then there are the tuna’s. Longtail (northern bluefin) Tuna are popular when fishing for pelagics. Mackerel tuna are common, yellowfin are a possibility and there are some bonitos thrown in for good measure.

And while the tuna’s and macks might be the staple targets, there’s no shortage of others.

Then there are the seriolas – kingfish and amberjacks. Billfish. Cobia. Mahi mahi. Wahoo. Trevallies. Anything is possible when you’re fishing for pelagics along this extraordinary piece of Australia’s coast.

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Fraser Coast Golden Trevally

Pelagic Species of Hervey Bay

Tackle For Pelagic Fishing

Fly fishing

Fishing for pelagics with fly gear is both challenging and exciting! Having a good quality fly reel, with plenty of capacity for backing, a large arbour and a smooth drag is a must. A full length intermediate line is most commonly used, as you do want your fly to get down under the surface, and the narrower diameter of an intermediate line is more easily cast if there is wind. Rods in the 10 – 11 weight range are ideal, you need plenty of lifting power in the butt section.

Lure fishing

A good quality spin rod and reel is best for this style of fishing, where getting distance with your cast and covering water is what it’s all about. When fishing for pelagics, a rod 7-8 feet in length is ideal, and needs to be able to handle 15 kilo braid. You’ll need a good quality reel, preferably with a fast retrieve ratio, and a smooth drag is essential – there’s nothing worse than being hooked up to a 20 kilo Longtail and have the reel seize up! I have seen this happen…

We do supply good quality fishing gear with our charters, but you’re welcome to bring your own!

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Fishing Charter for Pelagic

John’s Top 5 Tips For Targeting Pelagics On The Fraser/Capricorn Coast

  1. Buy the best quality gear you can afford, it will get a serious workout!
  2. When approaching a school of feeding fish, try to approach from the upwind side, avoid clunky gear changes that will put the fish down.
  3. If you are having trouble getting a bite, and your lure has definitely gone through a school of feeding fish without a hook-up , downsize your fly or lure to match it to the bait they’re feeding on.
  4. Small surf candies and metal slugs in the 30 gram range are normally my go-to flies and lures when fishing for tuna. Make sure they have good quality, strong sharp hooks, and upgrade the trebles.
  5. Constantly check your leader for scuff marks, and make sure you tie good knots. Pelagic species don’t tend to give you any second chances, all your terminal tackle and gear will be tested to its limit!

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Fishing For Pelagics With Guided Fishing Down Under

If you haven’t tried fishing for pelagics, I’ll guarantee there’s nothing that gets anglers more excited than sight casting to feeding fish! But there is an art to this style of fishing, and if you go on a charter with us we’ll show you how it’s done and hook you up to some arm stretching action.

The Hervey Bay area in particular is renowned for the size and quality of its pelagic species, so even if you’re a seasoned angler you’ll have every chance of catching your personal best on a day out with us.

We cater from first timers to experienced anglers – a day out on the water with us is more than just catching fish – it’s about sharing information and knowledge and having a great time too!

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Trevally Fishing

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